International Business Research Topics - MbaDjawebInfo

International Business Research Topics

International Business Research Topics

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  1. Programme/Module Catalogue
  2. 2017/8
  3. Modules
  4. TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT – 2017/8

Module code: MAN2142

Module provider

Surrey Business School

Module Leader

DUANMU J Dr (SBS)

Number of Credits

15

ECTS Credits

7.5

Framework

FHEQ Level 5

JACs code

N120

Module cap (Maximum number of students)

N/A

Module Availability

Semester 2

Overall student workload

Independent Study Hours: 117

Lecture Hours: 22

Tutorial Hours: 11

Assessment pattern

Assessment typeUnit of assessmentWeighting
School-timetabled exam/testCLASS TEST (1.5 HOURS)40
CourseworkINDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT60

Alternative Assessment

Qualifying Condition(s)

In order to achieve the threshold standard for the award of credits for this module, the student must meet the following criteria related to the learning outcomes.

Show evidence of a critical understanding of theory and practice in the field of contemporary international business management

Demonstrate the ability to identify and discuss practical implications of research studies

Prerequisites / Co-requisites

None

Module overview

As the Issues in International Business Management module focuses on ‘issues’ and their relevance, the content reflects contemporary themes and priorities. It is likely to include contributions from staff and/or invited speakers that are based on relevant special interests informed by research and/or professional engagement.

There is a coherent theme of taking into account multiple stakeholders and differences across countries and of how to manage international businesses to deal with these challenges. The module emphasises critical consideration of the practical implications of recent studies.

Module aims

The key aim of this module is to develop a critical understanding of selected contemporary issues in international business management.

Learning outcomes

Attributes Developed
001Demonstrate knowledge of major theories and research findings regarding the topics covered in the moduleK
002Identify practical implications of major theories and findings for international business managementCP
003Discuss the impact of multiple stakeholders on strategies and practices of international businesses and how multiple stakeholders are affected by strategies and practices of international businessesKC
004Critically evaluate and compare the effectiveness of various international business strategies and practicesCP
005Identify, synthesise and structure information regarding the module topics from academics books and journalsT
006Communicate ideas effectively in writingT

Attributes Developed

C – Cognitive/analytical

K – Subject knowledge

T – Transferable skills

P – Professional/Practical skills

Module content

Indicative topics (actual topics offered will be a selection from these topics, and/or others, according to contemporary relevance and the availability of staff expertise)

 

Theories of the multinational firm
Theories of internationalisation (including International New Ventures and Born Globals)
Headquarter-subsidiary relations in multinational corporations
Micro-politics in multinational corporations
Knowledge transfer and organisational learning in multinational corporations
International innovation strategies
Management of inter-organisational relations in an international context
Global stakeholder strategy
Corporate social responsibility in comparative perspective
Issues in Global Supply Chains
Institutional voids in emerging markets
Corporate strategies of international expansion
Environmental challenges and multinational corporations

Methods of Teaching / Learning

The teaching and learning strategy is designed to develop the students’ awareness of contemporary issues in international business management, drawing upon theory, empirical research and practice. The strong emphasis on connections between research and practice is reflected in discussion of the practical implications of research findings; analysis of case studies; and critical evaluation of relevant academic research.

 

The teaching and learning methods include:

Lectures and tutorials,

Part 1 consists of a formal lecture aimed at providing students with the knowledge of relevant theories

Part 2 consists of a tutorial aimed to be practical and interactive. Students will be encouraged to put their knowledge to practice by analysing cases related to international business. The tutorials involve active learning exercises and case studies, through which students explore connections between research and practice. SurreyLearn is used to host resources and provide a medium for further discussion.

 

The module involves a 2 hour lecture per week (11 weeks) and a 1 hour tutorial (11 weeks).

Assessment Strategy

Summative assessment

40 multiple choice questions, 1.5 hours, close book in the week before Easter.

This summative assessment will enable us to evaluate student learning for the first seven weeks of the semester, which will inform us to guide our efforts and activities in subsequent weeks to enhance student learning. We also aim to improve student attendance rate by having this middle term in-class test to promote student engagement.

2. Assignment to be submitted at the end of the semester

The assignment is designed to develop and evaluate student analytical ability to comprehend complex business decisions in a multiple stakeholder perspective.

 

Formative assessment and feedback:

We will provide students with feedback in weekly tutorials, where a variety of exercises, such as case study, multiple choice and essay questions, and discussing past assignments will be covered. Collectively, these exercises will prepare students for their in-class test as well as the assignment by the end of the semester.

We will also provide students with feedback on their in-class tests.

Reading list

Reading list for TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : http://aspire.surrey.ac.uk/modules/man2142

Programmes this module appears in

ProgrammeSemesterClassificationQualifying conditions
Business and Retail Management BSc (Hons) 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (Entrepreneurship) MBus 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
International Business Management MBus 2CompulsoryA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
International Business Management BSc (Hons) 2CompulsoryA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business and Retail Management MBus 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management MBus 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (HRM) MBus 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (Marketing) MBus 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management BSc (Hons) 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (Entrepreneurship) BSc (Hons) 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (HRM) BSc (Hons) 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (Marketing) BSc (Hons) 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module
Business Management (Dual degree with SII-DUFE) BSc (Hons) 2OptionalA weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module

Please note that the information detailed within this record is accurate at the time of publishing and may be subject to change. This record contains information for the most up to date version of the programme / module for the 2017/8 academic year.

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Topics in International Business


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Topics in International Business

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International business comes in many forms. This paper takes an in-depth look at three such arenas: International development, trade and multinational corporations. Each of these three forms of international business, while very different in structure, play a significant role in nations’ economies, business development and, just as President Wilson envisioned, the establishment and maintenance of close, peaceful relationships.

Keywords Free Trade Agreement; Multinational Corporation; International Development; USAID; World Trade Organization

International Business: Topics in International Business

Overview

Interstate commerce is by no means a new or even recently introduced concept. For thousands of years, nations have conducted trade with their immediate and regional neighbors. In the 15th century, they went much farther, as Europeans traveled across Asia and the Atlantic in search of new trade relationships. In the 20th century, President Woodrow Wilson used international business as a critical component in his vision of post-World War I peace as one of his historic 14 Points: “The removal, so far as possible, of all economic barriers and the establishment of an equality of trade conditions among all the nations consenting to the peace and associating themselves for its maintenance” (Halsall, 1997).

Wilson’s “point” is one that has reverberated throughout human history. International business is a constant in an ever-changing world. It transcends the politics and sociological disparities that often separate different cultures. This fact is due to the very nature of commerce: Mutual need drives both involved parties into the relationship without consideration of those issues.

International business comes in many forms. This paper takes an in-depth look at three such arenas: International development, trade and multinational corporations. Each of these three forms of international business, while very different in structure, play a significant role in nations’ economies, business development and, just as President Wilson envisioned, the establishment and maintenance of close, peaceful relationships.

International Development Aid

Among the more popular terms applied to nations in varying stages of development (one that is increasingly becoming considered outmoded and derogatory) are the monikers applied to so-called “first world,” “second world” and “third world” nations. The former of these three is affixed to wealthy and fully industrialized countries, chief among them the US and the European Union. “Second world” are those countries that have emerged from poverty and have established infrastructures that can foster full industrialization, such as Mexico and the non-European Union countries of eastern Europe. “Third world” nations, as logic suggests, are those whose citizens predominantly live in poverty with very few economic or technological resources to help them move “upward” on the international ladder.

The “three worlds” concept is one that, despite its unpopularity among those in academia and government, is reflective of the discernable gulf between wealthier industrialized nations and those that have yet to experience industrialization and the prosperity that comes with it. For a variety of reasons, however, virtually all industrialized nations have in place some sort of program that provides international development aid to less-developed countries. It is to these programs (and the relationships they build) that this paper next turns attention.

Mauritania, A Case Study

In 2005, the government of Mauritania was overthrown in a bloodless coup, with a military junta put in place of what the coup’s leaders called a totalitarian regime. Beyond that northwest African country’s boundaries, many observers decried the move against a democratically elected government. In the streets of the capital city of Nouakchatt, however, people welcomed the move as a move toward democracy and away from international isolation. Two years later, the country held its first post-coup democratic and open elections, installing a new president, Sidi Ould Cheikh Abdellahi, as well as a new parliament.

Abdellahi’s first order of business was business. Only eight months after his election, Abdellahi declared that the country was dedicated to a free, open market system and that government’s role was to guarantee the safety and well-being of its people. Mauritania, he said, would be neighborly and cooperative with its neighbors. Finally, he said, the nation would be dedicated to building its economic resources so that it could become part of the international business world. His comments, which appeared in a November 2007 edition of Foreign Affairs, were in effect an advertisement, inviting countries to join Abdellahi and the new government in rebuilding the new Mauritania. “Mauritania’s uniquely strategic position on the northwest African coast and blend of Arab and African culture,” he wrote, “sets the stage for mutually beneficial relationships with surrounding nations and particularly European, American, and Asian partners” (Foreign Affairs, 2007).

The efforts of Mauritania to attract international development funds and other forms of aid are not unique. Countless developing nations on nearly every continent recognize two important facts about their status: First, they desire to attract potential business, political and security partners from a membership in the international community; and second, they lack the infrastructure and/or the economic, social and political stability necessary to drawing investment.

The Attract

A central theme consistently arises in the discussion of international development aid, one that has been manifest in this author’s use of the terms “attract” and “draw.” International development, after all, is not a philanthropy. No national government would invest state funds in contributing development aid to a nation that will not use the monies in such a way that there is no sign of improvement, nor a return on that investment.

An examination of the history of the primary source of American international development, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), presents an illustration of this point. After World War II, efforts to reconstruct a devastated European theater proved successful, lasting until 1951. From that point onward, however, the US international aid system became confused and schizophrenic, with countless Congressionally-implemented subparts instilled in the place of European reconstruction aid systems. President Eisenhower and his successor, President Kennedy, saw the machinations of that system becoming bogged down in oft-contradictory bureaucracy. They also took notice of the lack of criteria used to determine the recipients of that aid. In 1960, the public’s taste for helping war-torn, impoverished and unstable governments had soured significantly.

In 1961, however, Kennedy gave new life to the policy of international development. Dismantling the multifarious aid agencies and organizations, he crafted together USAID under his “Foreign Assistance Act.” The focus of development programs, he said, would be on developing countries whose stabilization and growth would almost certainly ensure security (particularly at the height of the Cold War) and even trade relationships. A major point he delivered in his proposal was that the economic collapse of developing countries “would be disastrous to our national security, harmful to our comparative prosperity, and offensive to our conscience” (USAID, 2005).

The United States is not alone in its “no free riders” position with regard to international aid. Like the US, the European Union (EU), which has been the predominant figure in the redevelopment of the former Soviet Union countries, has long worked to provide aid to those nations that are rebuilding from decades of external control. However, in determining the amount of funds to distribute among developing nations, the EU also seeks some sort of intrastate benefit from such relationships. While the European nations do not expect an immediate economic return, its international development funds tend to flow more freely when they are delivered to countries that are strategically and potentially important economic partners (Kostadinova, 2004).

International Development Planning vs. Philanthropic Relief

An important distinction to be made here between international development funding and disaster or philanthropic relief. The former, to which the above text refers, is a long-term investment designed to build infrastructures, systems and programs that developing nations can use to restart…

(The entire section is 3,842 words.)

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