This essay got a high-school senior into Harvard, Yale, and MIT … - MbaDjawebInfo

This essay got a high-school senior into Harvard, Yale, and MIT ...

This essay got a high-school senior into Harvard, Yale, and MIT …

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Yale 2017-2018 Supplemental Essay Prompts

July 27, 2017
  • yale
  • essay topic
  • ivy league

Planning to apply to Yale University this fall? Here are the essay prompts you’ll need to answer to submit your Yale application.

Yale isn’t just another Ivy League. Learn more about the university’s program, environment and campus culture before you decide to apply! Here’s a university overview of Yale.

Yale University’s application is available on both the Common Application and the Coalition Application. Please note that the main essay prompts on the two platforms are not the same. Here are the Common Application’s 2017-2018 essay prompts and the Coalition Application’s 2017-2018 essay prompts .

Short Answer Questions

  • Students at Yale have plenty of time to explore their academic interests before committing to one or more major fields of study. Many students either modify their original academic direction or change their minds entirely. As of this moment, what academic areas seem to fit your interests or goals most comfortably? Please indicate up to three from the list provided.

  • Why do these areas appeal to you? (100 words or fewer)

  • What is it about Yale that has led you to apply? (125 words or fewer)

  • What inspires? (35 words or fewer)

  • Yale’s residential colleges regularly host intimate conversations with guests representing a wide range of experiences and accomplishments. What person, past or present, would you invite to speak? What question would you ask? (35 words or fewer)

  • You are teaching a Yale course. What is it called? (35 words or fewer)

  • Most first-year Yale students live in suites of four to six people. What would you contribute to the dynamic of your suite? (35 words or fewer)

Don’t overthink your answers! Be true to who you are and answer these questions honestly. This is where you can let your personality shine through!

Applying to college?
View the app files and essays of accepted students.

LEARN MORE

Supplemental Essay (Common Application Only)

Please choose two of the following topics and respond to each in 250 words or fewer.

  • What do you most enjoy learning?

  • Reflect on your engagement with a community to which you belong. How do you feel you have contributed to this community?

  • Write on something you would like us to know about you that you have not conveyed elsewhere in your application.

Supplemental Essays (Coalition Application Only)

In 300 words or fewer, write on one of the two essay topics below.

  • What do you most enjoy learning?

  • Reflect on your engagement with a community to which you belong. How do you feel you have contributed to this community?

In addition to writing on your chosen topic, upload an audio file, video, image, or document you have created that is meaningful to you and relates to your essay. Above your essay, include a one-sentence description of what you have submitted.

Both supplemental essay requirements on the Common Application and the Coalition Application are fairly similar. As suggested in one of the prompts, it’s important for you to look at your application holistically. Here are some questions to think about: 

  • What have you already emphasized in your personal statement?

  • What do your extracurricular activities say about you?

  • Which side of you did you show off in the Short Answer Questions?

  • Now, what about you is missing in the application?

Still not sure what we mean by that? We’ve put together a package of profiles from the most recently admitted class at Yale! Unlock this Yale 2021 package to view full successful application files and learn how to craft your own:

Our  premium plans  offer different level of profile access and data insights that can help you get into your dream school. Unlock any of our  packages  or search our  undergraduate profile database  to find specific profiles that can help you make an informed choice about where to apply!

 

About The Author

Frances Wong
Frances Wong

Frances was born in Hong Kong and received her bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University. She loves super sad drama television, cooking, and reading. Her favorite person on Earth isn’t actually a member of the AdmitSee team – it’s her dog Cooper.

 

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College Essay Guy – Get Inspired

Ethan Sawyer

Supplemental Essays

A Brief How-To Guide for the Short Answer Questions for Highly-Selective Colleges

Ethan Sawyer

Supplemental Essays

A+Brief+How-to+Guide+for+the+Short+Answer+Questions+on+Your+Common+App-compressor.jpg

You know those Common App short answer questions required by USC, Princeton, Columbia, Stanford, U Chicago, and Yale?

Apparently I’ve got a lot to say about them. How do I know? 

Because, as I was editing a student’s short answers this week, I realized that, as with the Activities List and “Why us” essays , I was repeating myself.

Time to create a guide, I thought.

This is that guide. 

With 11 tips. 

In a Dos and Dont’s format.

– – – 

1. DO: Think of your short answers as an advent calendar. 

 
Whose idea was this?

 

Whose idea was this?

Each one is a tiny window into your soul. So make sure when the reader opens each one that there’s something awesome inside. Like a tiny horse with miniature bells that actually jingle. Not like a crappy piece of milk chocolate (you know the kind I’m talking about).

 I feel your pain.

I feel your pain.

Can you do that in like fifteen words? You can. How?

2. DO: Use all the space allotted to explain your answer.

Pro-Tip: You’re often given space for thirteen words for a short answer. So use it up!

In other words, answer “Why,” even if the prompt doesn’t ask you to. Why?

Because each answer is an opportunity to get to know you better and sometimes the takeaway isn’t clear or obvious from the thing itself. Example:

Question: (from USC) What’s your favorite food? 
Just-okay answer: “Tacos.”

Your reader might read this and think: Um, great. You… live in California?

Better answer: “My abuela’s birria tacos–recipe has been passed down for generations.” 

#culture #family #goats (Because that’s what birria is: goats. #themoreyouknow)

Another example of a just-okay answer:

Q: Who is your role model?
A: Louis Zamperini

Reader thinks: Great, no idea who that is. 

Don’t make the reader Google your answer. She won’t.

Instead, write: 

Olympic athlete Louis Zamperini, who survived concentration camps and overcame severe alcoholism. 

But…


Understanding your feelings, needs, & values makes your writing more potent and engaging. learn how to identify those things in my brainstorming exercise here.


3. DON’T make the short reason you provide (or any of your answers) super obvious.

Example for USC question: 

Q: What’s your favorite website? 
A: Instagram (social media photo-sharing site)

Yup. That’s… pretty much what Instagram is. Thanks for telling me zero about you.

Another bad example (a Stanford admission essay example):

Q: What historical moment or event do you wish you could have witnessed?
A: The Big Bang. It was the beginning of our universe and it would have been amazing to see that. 

Yup, that’s… what that was. (Also, fyi, pretty much everyone writes “The Big Bang” for this question.)

Better answer (by a student accepted in 2015): 

A: I want to watch George Washington go shopping. I have an obsession with presidential trivia, and the ivory-gummed general is far and away my favorite. Great leaders aren’t necessarily defined by their moments under pressure; sometimes tiny decisions are most telling–like knickers or pantaloons?

Also:

4. DO get specific.

Q: What inspires you?

Non-specific example: Documentaries. They are my favorite source of inspiration

(Side note: Don’t sound like a robot.)

Better answer: Documentaries. “Forks Over Knives” made me go vegan; “Born into Brothels” inspired my Gold Award.

Also:

5. DON’T for your favorite quote, say something that you’d find on one of those “Success” posters or a Hallmark card. 

 
                                                                  Mm. Deep.

                                                                 Mm. Deep.

 

Cheesy examples:

  • “Life is what you make of it.” (or)
  • “Dreams are X” (or) “Always follow your dreams” (or)
  • “Life is like a dream and dreams are like life are dreams dreams life life dreams.” 

Pretty much anything with “life” or “dreams.”


CHECK OUT SESSION FIVE IN MY ‘HOW TO WRITE AMAZING SUPPLEMENTAL ESSAYS’ COURSE.
WANT SOME HELP TAKING YOUR SHORT ANSWERS TO THE NEXT LEVEL?


6. DON’T use Top 50 adjectives on the “3-5 words to describe you” question.

Why not? Again, they don’t tell us much. 

And what are the Top 50 adjectives? You can probably guess them. 
Examples: adventurous, friendly, compassionate, passionate, empathetic, passionate (yeah, I’m making a point here). If you’re writing a Uchicago supplement or, Harvard supplement essay, or Yale supplement essay, think beyond the generic adjectives.

In fact, don’t use adjectives at all. One of my favorite answers for this was “Mulan.”

 Yeah, that Mulan.

Yeah, that Mulan.

Oh, and:

7. DON’T use adjectives that repeat info already clear on your application.

Example: motivated, hardworking, determined

Cool. You and every other student with a GPA above 3.5. Particularly if you’re writing a Upenn supplement or University of Michigan essay.

Which reminds me: 

8. DO make sure your adjectives are all clearly different and interesting: 

In the example above, they all basically mean the same thing. So make sure they reveal something interesting about you.  Tell me who you’d rather meet:

Someone who is ‘passionate, persistent, and extroverted?’

Or would you rather meet an ‘ardent, panglossian visionary?’

Or maybe the ‘gregarious horse-whispering philosopher queen?’

I have questions for that last girl.

Oh, and hey:


PREPARING FOR A STANFORD INTERVIEW? CHECK OUT THIS TOTALLY EPIC GUIDE TO PREPARING FOR YOUR INTERVIEW, INCLUDING College Interview Tips and Strategies AND COLLEGE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS


9. DON’T worry so much about pissing people off. 

I’m doing that in this guide, using sarcasm and words like “pissing.” 

Let me clarify:

Students often ask me, “Is [this] okay? Is [that] okay? I don’t want them to think that I’m too [blank].” 

Oh, you mean you don’t want them to think that you have a personality. 

I encourage students to take (calculated) risks on these. To push boundaries. To be, I don’t know, funny? Human? Compare, for example, the following answers: 

(Yale) What’s something you can’t live without? 

Play-it-safe answer: My family.

Me: Zzzzzz.

Better answer: The Tony Stark-made arc reactor in my chest

 This is me after reading that answer.

This is me after reading that answer.

Which reminds me: 

10. Don’t check your humor at the door. 

If you’re funny in life, feel free to be funny in your short answers. If you’re not funny, no need to start now. 

Irony is one of the best ways to demonstrate intelligence and sensitivity to nuance.

Check out these just-okay and better examples, all for Yale 2015:

JUST-OKAY ANSWERS:

The two qualities I most admire in other people are… ambition and drive
(SMH. Same thing, bro.)

I am most proud of… my passion.
(There’s that word again. Also, it’s too abstract in this context. Show, don’t tell.)

I couldn’t live without… my cell phone.
(Yup, you and everyone else.)

Who or what inspires you… the sunset
(Seriously?)

What do you wish you were better at being or doing? Answering these questions.
(Heads-up: meta answers are pretty common.) 

Most Yale freshmen live in suites of four to six students. What would you contribute to the dynamic of your suite? Good times and great conversation.
(Oh look I’m asleep again.)

BETTER ANSWERS (written by a student who was accepted to Yale in 2015):

The two qualities I most admire in other people are… Spock’s logic & Kirk’s passion

I am most proud of… Only cried once during The Notebook (maybe twice)

I couldn’t live without… The Tony Stark-made arc reactor in my chest

Who or what inspires you? Shia LaBeouf yelling “Just Do It”

What do you wish you were better at being or doing? Dancing-especially like Drake, Hotline Bling style

Most Yale freshmen live in suites of four to six students. What would you contribute to the dynamic of your suite? A Magical Mystery Tour of Beatles keyboard songs

You totally want to meet this guy, right?

Make the reader totally want to meet you. 

A few final tips:

11. DO: Offer a variety of things you’re interested in.

So if you love science and you wrote a supplemental essay about science, don’t tell us about 20 journals/websites/publications you’ve read… on science.

Show not only your interests in astrophysics but also literature, philosophy, Star Trek, programming, and Godfather 1 and 2 (but not 3.)

Got a favorite short answer example? Share in the comments below!


supplemental essay examples:  How to Write the Stanford Roommate Essay (Part 1 of 2)


WANT SOME HELP TAKING YOUR short answers TO THE NEXT LEVEL?

CHECK OUT SESSION five IN MY ‘HOW TO apply to college’  COURSE.

 
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Video Course: How to Write a Personal Statement

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Video Course: College Application + Supplemental Essays

 Video Course: How to Answer the New UC Application Prompts

Video Course: How to Answer the New UC Application Prompts

 Order the Book: College Essay Essentials

Order the Book: College Essay Essentials

 Get the Complete Guide to Writing the "Why Us" Essay

Get the Complete Guide to Writing the “Why Us” Essay

 

 

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